Tag Archives: sequel

Stand-Off, Review

24 May

Stand-Off by Andrew Smith

Plot: This is the sequel to Winger. Ryan Dean is now a fifteen year old senior at Pine Mountain Boarding School. He is seeing how his relationship progresses with Annie Altman, as well as dealing with some leftover issues with Seanie and JP from the last year. A major hurdle Ryan Dean runs into is his new roommate Sam Abernathy. Sam is a twelve year old freshman with extreme claustrophobia, an addiction to microwave popcorn and the cooking channel, and seemingly no sense of how he is viewed by those around him.

There are also some serious changes on the rugby team after Joey’s absence that are hard for Ryan Dean to handle. Enter a chance meeting between him and Joey’s family that leaves Ryan Dean trying to connect with Joey’s younger brother Nico, short for Dominic. Ryan Dean also wonders what Joey may have wanted to tell him shortly before his passing, and whether or not he had told Nico.

Would you recommend this book? Yes, for older teens due to language and mature themes. The tone of the book was a little different than the first one. Ryan Dean had lost some of his young, innocent humor and was a bit more jaded and downright mean at times. However, there were still parts that made me laugh out loud, and it was nice to see some loose ends tied up.

4 stars

–Jen

Winger, Review

17 May

Winger by Andrew Smith

Plot: Ryan Dean West (Ryan Dean is his full first name, though he is known by the nickname Winger) is a 14-year-old junior at a rich boarding school called Pine Mountain. Placed into Opportunity Hall, a dorm for troublemakers, Ryan Dean is forced to room with Chas Becker, a popular but difficult person to get along with. Winger tries to maintain his friendships with fellow Rugby players Seanie and JP, but that does not always prove to be an easy task due to their age differences and female trouble.

Ryan Dean is trying to take things to the next level with his good friend Annie, while also dealing with not altogether unwelcome advances from Megan, who is dating Chas. He also forms an unlikely bond with another rugby player who takes a lot of heat from the other guys.

Would you recommend this book? Yes, for more mature audiences. There is a lot of bad language and adult themes. I like the fact that Ryan Dean is so honest as a narrator so you know exactly what he is thinking and feeling, and you’ll find yourself laughing out loud about some of what he encounters, and just his thoughts in general.  There is a surprise ending that I was most definitely not expecting. I look forward to reading the sequel to see what senior year has in store for Ryan Dean.

5 stars

–Jen

Finding Dory, Movie Trailer

14 Apr

Allegiant, Movie Trailer

31 Mar

Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics, Review

30 Mar

Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics by Chris Grabenstein

Plot: In this sequel, Kyle and his teammates are back again to compete in Mr. Lemoncello’s first-ever Library Olympics! This time teams from all across America have been invited to compete–but throughout the course of the games it is discovered that some books are missing. Is somebody trying to censor what books are allowed in the library? All the teams must band together to solve mysteries, riddles and puzzles and get to the bottom of this issue. Can they do it in time before Mr. Lemoncello decides to give up on the library?

Would you recommend this book? Yes.

4 stars

–Jen

The Wait Is Over!

29 Jan

Drums, Girls, and Dangerous Pie, Review

30 Nov

Drums, Girls, and Dangerous Pie by Jordan Sonnenblick

Plot: 13-year-old Steven’s life is interrupted suddenly when his 5-year-old brother Jeffrey is diagnosed with cancer. Steven’s life changes at home and at school as he deals with his brother’s illness, his parents’ reaction to it, and the emotional and financial repercussions the family must face because of Jeffrey’s diagnosis. Sonnenblick’s writing is simple, but he understands young teens and perfectly captures Steven’s struggle with his own coming of age story while dealing with a family tragedy. This book is an excellent example of how illness affects everyone in a family, and would serve as an excellent resource for teens who are going through a difficult time (or any sort) with their family. I am interested in reading more of Sonnenblick’s writings, particularly the follow-up book to Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie, which follows Jeffery’s story several years after his initial diagnosis.

Would you recommend this book? Yes.

4 stars

–Lisa