Tag Archives: nomination

2016 Teens’ Top Ten Nominees Announced

20 Apr

The Teens’ Top Ten is a “teen choice” list where teens nominate and choose their favorite books published in the previous year. If you’re between the ages of 12 and 18, you can vote for your favorites starting in August. The winners will then be announced after Teen Read Week in October. Start reading now so that you’re fully prepared to vote this summer!

You can also check out the titles here. How many have you read so far?

 

The William C. Morris Award Finalists

9 Feb

Check out all the finalists for the William C. Morris Award, an award given each year to a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens.

Morris 1

Morris 2

Morris 3

Morris 4

 

 

Teens’ Top Ten List for 2015

14 Nov

The winners of the Teens’ Top Ten for 2015 have finally been revealed! Teens from all over the world voted on their favorite books from the previous year. Over 27,000 votes came in for the 24 nominees.

Here are the official winners:

  1. The Shadow Throne by Jennifer A. Nielsen
  2. I Become Shadow by Joe Shine
  3. To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han
  4. My Life with the Walter Boys by Ali Novak
  5. Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas
  6. The Bane Chronicles by Cassandra Clare
  7. The Young Elites by Marie Lu
  8. The Kiss of Deception by Mary E. Pearson
  9. Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson
  10. The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith

The Kingdom of Little Wounds, Review

6 Jul

The Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Plot: The author of this book describes it as “a fairy tale about syphilis” so let’s get it out in the open that this book has some very mature themes. Despite the fact that this book was a Printz Honor Book in 2014, many readers have protested that this book is too dark, violent, and sexual to be considered a Young Adult book. Of course, I had to read it for myself! The story takes place in a 16th-Century fictional Scandinavian town, and chronicles the life of the royal family through the eyes of two of their servants. Ava Bingen shows promise as a royal seamstress, but when she accidentally pricks the queen with a needle, she is sent to Lord Nicolas for punishment. Lord Nicolas uses power and sexual force to convince Ava to become a nursery maid – and spy on the royal family for Nicolas. While acting as a maid, Ava meets Midi Sorte, a mute nursemaid, who is also consorting with Lord Nicolas behind closed doors. Through the narration of the two servant girls, life in the royal palace is observed. A mystery illness affects all of the royal children. The queen’s sanity and motives are questioned. The king’s affections lie with someone other than the queen. And those who are closest to the royal family may not have noble intentions. As more of the plot is revealed, Ava and Midi find their lives becoming more entwined together, much to their displeasure. But the two servants soon learn that they may only have each other to trust. This book is intense, violent, sexual, and dark. It is for mature readers due to the highly graphic content. However, it is a very interesting read about 16th-Century palace life, and is probably a case of this being a more truthful account than many non-fiction works. It’s a fascinating look at the interworking of a royal palace, and the secrets and lies it hides. It’s also a smack-you-in-the-face honest look at abuse of power, which is certain to open the readers’ eyes to other examples of this throughout history.

Would you recommend this book? Yes and no. While offering an interesting look at history, it seems a bit mature for a young adult book.

3 stars

–Lisa

Feed, Review

30 Mar

Feed by M.T. Anderson

Plot: In the future, the Earth has been depleted of many of its natural resources and is slowly dying. Humans have opened up space travel and have colonized on the moon. Nearly everyone on Earth is linked to “the feed,” which helps people make decisions about what they eat, buy, and think.

During a recreational trip to the moon, Titus is drawn to Violet. They become closer friends after suffering from a hacker attack while in a club on the moon. Violet’s feed is severely damaged during this attack, likely because she received the feed much later than other people (because her family wanted to avoid being connected). Titus and Violet continue their relationship when they return to Earth. Violet’s problems with her feed become more severe. As it becomes more apparent that Violet will not be able to live with a damaged feed, Violet turns to Titus to help maintain her memories.

Violet tries to open Titus’s eyes to the serious problems (both political and environmental) that are happening on Earth, but Titus is scared to leave the safety of his mainstream, feed-fed world. As the feed causes Violet’s body to shut down, Titus gets scared and begins to ignore her. What will happen to Violet with Titus not around to help her?

Would you recommend this book? Yes.This book took a long time for me to get into, mostly because of the slang language and the science fiction nature. However, I did enjoy it in the end. It offers some great lessons in letting convenience and technology play too large of a role in our lives. Although more time was spent on discussing the feed itself, I was very interested in the state of the Earth. Technological advances are often looked at as a benefit to society, but there are definite repercussions in the manufacturing and use of these technologies. Feed highlights how dangerous this can be to both humankind and the Earth.

3 stars

–Lisa

Maggot Moon, Book Trailer

16 Jan

2015 Nonfiction Award nominations have been announced!

30 Dec

The 2015 Award for Excellence in Nonfiction nominees have been announced! This honors the best book written for young adults in the genre in the previous publishing year. Have you read any of the nominees below?

1. Laughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw

In this focused, intelligent, and most of all hilarious memoir, Shane Burcaw recalls both the normal and deeply unique experiences he has endured living with spinal muscular atrophy. His anecdotal essays are thought-provoking, and his whip-smart style puts him in a league with some of today’s best humorists.

2. The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion & the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming

Fleming deftly illuminates the fascinating life of Czar Nicholas II; his wife, Alexandra; and their children, describing their ostentatiously privileged upbringing, the dramatic fall of the Russian Empire, and their tragic deaths in this moving and insightful biography of Russia’s Romanov family. With captivating photos, extensive primary sources, and recent research about the fate of the Romanov family, Fleming tells a gripping, comprehensive story of life in a pivotal period of Russian history.

3. Ida M. Tarbell: The Woman Who Challenged Big Business–And Won! by Emily Arnold McCully

Born before the Civil War and living in what was truly a man’s world, Ida Tarbell was one of the first practitioners of what we now call investigative journalism. Although she is not well known today, she made a name for herself in her own time by taking on the exploitative practices of John D. Rockefeller and the Standard Oil Company. McCully presents a readable and captivating account of this unusual woman, showing the reader her inconsistencies and faults as well as the grit, determination, and intellect that allowed Tarbell to support herself and her family with her writing.

4. The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin

As World War II escalated overseas, African American sailors at Port Chicago were under pressure to load bombs faster and faster onto waiting ships, until finally a horrific explosion killed hundreds. In the days that followed, 50 men refused to work under such unsafe conditions and were charged with mutiny. Sheinkin masterfully weaves interviews, court records, and other primary sources with his driving narrative to tell the complex and little-known history of the Port Chicago Disaster of 1944.

5. Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek by Maya Van Wagenen

Maya Van Wagenen’s memoir is one part 1950s popularity guidebook mixed with two parts courage and one truly modern geek girl. Van Wagenen takes on the social hierarchy of middle school and through the use of Betty Cornell’s Teen-Age Popularity Guide manages to achieve acceptance and understanding. Her memoir is charming, funny, and shaped by the tools every ‘50s girl used to secure her standing in the social order—girdles, hats, makeup, diet, and a properly erect posture.