Tag Archives: mystery

Allegiant, Movie Trailer

31 Mar

Advertisements

Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics, Review

30 Mar

Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics by Chris Grabenstein

Plot: In this sequel, Kyle and his teammates are back again to compete in Mr. Lemoncello’s first-ever Library Olympics! This time teams from all across America have been invited to compete–but throughout the course of the games it is discovered that some books are missing. Is somebody trying to censor what books are allowed in the library? All the teams must band together to solve mysteries, riddles and puzzles and get to the bottom of this issue. Can they do it in time before Mr. Lemoncello decides to give up on the library?

Would you recommend this book? Yes.

4 stars

–Jen

We Were Liars, Review

12 Oct

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Plot: The Sinclair family is an affluent old-money family who spends their summers on their private island in Massachusetts. From the outside, they appear to be perfect; however, we all know that can’t possibly be the truth. This is their story – of how they spend their summers, of the bonds that tie them together, and the lies which tear them apart. And that’s all I can say about the plot without giving entirely too much away. If you haven’t read this book, you’ll want to have a somewhat clean slate going into it (although I had the same feeling reading this one as I did reading Gone Girl – I knew that there was more going on than it appears, and I knew it wasn’t going to end well for at least one of the characters). This was a quick read, and an interesting look inside an old, established family. It took me a while to see where the author was taking this book, and then I was hooked. There’s family drama, romance, and mystery – this book is pretty sure to please a variety of readers. Where the ending was not totally shocking to me, I can see where some people will be blown away by it. I would certainly pick up another book by Lockhart to at least compare writing styles and topics.

Would you recommend this book? Yes.

4 stars

–Lisa

The Good Girls, Review

28 Sep

The Good Girls by Sara Shepard (sequel to The Perfectionists)

Plot: Where we last left off, Julie, Parker, Ava, Mackenzie, and Caitlin suspected their teacher, Mr. Granger, of being involved in the death of their classmate Nolan Hotchkiss. The girls had played a prank on Nolan who later ended up dead, though not by their doing. This book revolves around the girls trying to clear their name, which is made more difficult as more people they know end up dead. Suspicions are raised; are the girls now starting to suspect each other?

Would you recommend this book? Yes. There was a major plot twist close to the end that I was not expecting at all. It made me want to go back and reread the first book as well as the second book to see how I missed it. Perfect for fans of mystery and suspense. The ending is also set up for another book, should the author wish to continue the series.

5 stars

–Jen

The Accident Season, Book Trailer

12 Sep

If the Witness Lied, Review

13 Jul

If the Witness Lied by Caroline B. Cooney

Plot: This book relies heavily on technology throughout the book. In the first chapter, Jack discusses “that television is a force in destroying his family,” and there are many more references to the negative effect being in the media spotlight has on Jack and Tris. However, Aunt Cheryl has a much different view of television, watching programs regularly with almost a religious zeal. Her adoration of television and media ultimately leads her to arrange for Tris to become the focus of a reality show. The interaction with the television crew serves as an immediate conflict for Jack, who struggles to protect Tris from further media exposure.

In addition to television, texting is also a featured technology, with Jack and his sisters Madison and Smithy using texts as their primary means of communication. Also crucial to the plot are the cell phone photographs retrieved from Jack’s deceased father’s cell phone, which reveals to Jack and Madison some important information about Aunt Cheryl. Finally, technology is used to help bring resolution to the story, when Jack’s grandparents arrive suddenly on the scene to help the children. Nonny says to Jack, “Darling, this isn’t the eighteenth century” showing that technology makes communication easy, despite the circumstances.

Would you recommend this book? Yes and no. I have read other books by Cooney, and have enjoyed them; however, If the Witness Lied was not one of her stronger books. I felt little connection to any of the protagonists, and Aunt Cheryl came across as a caricature rather than a true villain. The plot has entirely too many holes, and Cheryl’s involvement with the children would have never happened in real life. Technology is the only means to provide any sense of plausibility in this story. The computer records, recordings, and photographic evidence are provided so that the reader will say “this must have happened this way, because there is real evidence to prove it.” Cooney’s earlier thrillers and mysteries were written when digital technologies were either undeveloped or in its infancy, and those plots worked because of the lack of technology. Perhaps Cooney forced the use of technology into her plot too much in this book.

3 stars

–Lisa

Ask the Dark, Book Trailer

3 Jul